Dicks I Have Studied
runecestershire:

dicksihavestudied's recent comment on Henry IV rejecting the “your majesty” address and toning it back down to “your grace” put a bad idea in my mind.

Hahaha. As a Dick fan, my fav is “so usurpy”!

runecestershire:

dicksihavestudied's recent comment on Henry IV rejecting the “your majesty” address and toning it back down to “your grace” put a bad idea in my mind.

Hahaha. As a Dick fan, my fav is “so usurpy”!

iconuk01:

e-l-s-a-b-a:

stalinistqueens:

wingedbyday:

//Absurdly helpful for people writing royal characters and/or characters who interact with royalty and members of the nobility.
[x]

Citizen is simpler and more beautiful~ but just in case anyone needs this.

DUDE BUT THIS IS WHAT I’VE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE
in medieval times you ONLY addressed a king/queen with “Your Majesty”, NEVER “Your Highness”.  To address a king/queen with “Your Highness” was considered an insult.

It bugs the hell out of me, and I’m not even THAT much of a monarchist, but when I see books/TV having a monarch refered to as “Your Highness”, or a prince/princess as “Your Majesty” it’s like nails down a blackboard.

Actually, that’s not strictly true that you ONLY addressed a king or queen as “your majesty” in medieval times. For much of the medieval period, “your grace” was perfectly acceptable. England’s Richard II pushed for people to call him “your majesty” and it pissed off a fair few nobles. There’s a decent amount of scholarship on Richard II and the language of kingship.
I believe, also, that Henry IV scaled back the fancy language and stuck with “your grace.” I believe most of the kings of England did actually, but I would have to check the scholarship.
I cannot speak beyond England, but “your majesty” was probably mainly reserved for emperors. “Your Grace” was perfectly fine for medieval kings since they were supposed to be not much different from their nobles.

iconuk01:

e-l-s-a-b-a:

stalinistqueens:

wingedbyday:

//Absurdly helpful for people writing royal characters and/or characters who interact with royalty and members of the nobility.

[x]

Citizen is simpler and more beautiful~ but just in case anyone needs this.

DUDE BUT THIS IS WHAT I’VE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE

in medieval times you ONLY addressed a king/queen with “Your Majesty”, NEVER “Your Highness”.  To address a king/queen with “Your Highness” was considered an insult.

It bugs the hell out of me, and I’m not even THAT much of a monarchist, but when I see books/TV having a monarch refered to as “Your Highness”, or a prince/princess as “Your Majesty” it’s like nails down a blackboard.

Actually, that’s not strictly true that you ONLY addressed a king or queen as “your majesty” in medieval times. For much of the medieval period, “your grace” was perfectly acceptable. England’s Richard II pushed for people to call him “your majesty” and it pissed off a fair few nobles. There’s a decent amount of scholarship on Richard II and the language of kingship.

I believe, also, that Henry IV scaled back the fancy language and stuck with “your grace.” I believe most of the kings of England did actually, but I would have to check the scholarship.

I cannot speak beyond England, but “your majesty” was probably mainly reserved for emperors. “Your Grace” was perfectly fine for medieval kings since they were supposed to be not much different from their nobles.

who is your favorite dick you have studied and why?
Anonymous

This is so tough! I owe a big debt to three specific Dicks.

Richard III. This guy got me interested in medieval history. The medieval history professor at a nearby university was my mentor in high school, and he was also fascinated by Richard III. He would pass books on to me, and we would meet every so often to discuss Richard III and late medieval England. It was pretty awesome. It was through these different books about Richard III that I realized just how much history was subject to interpretation (which is not something you really get in high school). Richard III, and studied about him, made me realize I could do history.

Richard, earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans. I chanced across this younger brother of Henry III and decided to learn more about him. My undergrad thesis was originally going to be about Richard of Cornwall and what he did, but I actually found his three wives more fascinating. I consequently researched Richard and his wives (Isabella Marshal, Sanchia of Provence, and Beatrix of Falkenburg), and decided I wanted to do women’s history. Yes, weirdly enough, it was a Dick that led me to women and gender studies.

Richard II. In high school, I also dabbled in Richard II. I purchased Nigel Saul’s biography because I was curious about this “other Richard” (Richard I has never interested me as much. I think this is because he’s such a famous warrior). Richard II seemed okay, and I kind of forgot about him. In grad school, I was struggling to find a dissertation topic when infertility came to me. Richard and Anne of Bohemia immediately popped into my mind, so I knew I could do the project.

So I owe all these Dicks and love them all the best : )

From Queens of England By Norah Lofts (1977)

I snagged this old book at a library sale (only 50 cents!).

According to Lofts, riding side-saddle is often blamed for miscarriages. I have never heard this before. Hmmmmm

This had been a good week

We had Fall Break, which means I only had to work two days this week :)

And tomorrow I’m going to see Huey Lewis and the News.

Richard II’s Sense of English History

This is an article by Mark Ormrod that we briefly mentioned a long time ago. Months ago, maybe even a year.

Anyway, I scanned it a little while back because I was supposed to email it to someone. However, that email address doesn’t work. If you see this, please message me with your email or hit me up at dicksihavestudied@gmail.com.

If anyone would like a pdf of this article, message or email me, and I will send it along!

Getting hit on … or not

(Sorry not medieval!)

I just saw this post, and while I appreciate the sentiment, it just reminded me of how fraught my relationship is with the concept of “getting hit on.”

I don’t want to be in a sexual and/or romantic relationship with anyone. It’s not my thing. So logically it doesn’t matter if I get hit or not because my answer is no. It’s easier to not get hit on if your answer is going to be no.

And I don’t get hit on, which is fine by me. EXCEPT. Except sometimes, when I’m feeling down, I think about how hardly anyone ever hits on me, and I just end up feeling ugly and undesirable. What’s wrong with me! Why doesn’t anyone want me!

It’s not as though I want to be harassed, but the media sends us messages that essentially promote that. “Catcalling: harassment or compliment?” This implies that catcalling might be a compliment, or that maybe women should take it as a compliment, and then we get locked in a sad Catch-22. Catcalling is unwelcome, but if you hear enough people suggest it’s meant as a compliment then you start to feel unattractive if it never happens to you. I think this is a perfect example of how the system messes with our minds: we’re damned if we get it and damned if we don’t.

It’s just a sad sign of how I’ve internalized society’s message that, as a woman, I should be sexually desirable. I don’t want to have sex with anyone, yet I sometimes feel that I must be an unlovable, unattractive person simply because people don’t hit on me. And I have a loving, supportive family! How much harder this must be for people who don’t.

It’s messed up, although my main point is that the pernicious idea that a woman’s worth is tied up in her sexual attractiveness (such as internet commentators who dismiss women’s concerns because “oh well, she’s ugly and I wouldn’t have sex with her anyway”) crops up in places I wouldn’t even think it would, such as my own emotions. It sucks.

Anyway, just wanted to get that out there.

sea-dilemma:

moonparlance:

youngblackandvegan:

micdotcom:

A university president just gave up a lot of his salary to raise his school’s minimum wage

In some pretty awesome and uplifting news, Kentucky State University’s interim president Raymond Burse has given up more than $90,000 of his nearly $350,000 salary to help raise university workers’ minimum wage to $10.25 an hour.
"This is not a publicity stunt"


Black male excellence

Amazing


Challenge issued, university/college presidents!

sea-dilemma:

moonparlance:

youngblackandvegan:

micdotcom:

A university president just gave up a lot of his salary to raise his school’s minimum wage

In some pretty awesome and uplifting news, Kentucky State University’s interim president Raymond Burse has given up more than $90,000 of his nearly $350,000 salary to help raise university workers’ minimum wage to $10.25 an hour.

"This is not a publicity stunt"

Black male excellence

Amazing

Challenge issued, university/college presidents!

sharp-dressed-demon:

I am very serious about my AP Lit homework.

furthergeekery
You have mentioned Eleanor and Sanchia of Provence on your blog a couple times. How extraordinary was it for four daughters to marry kings? Especially as I don't think Provence was very wealthy or important in their time, correct me if I am wrong?
Anonymous

You are correct. I did my undergraduate thesis on Sanchia of Provence and Isabella Marshal, so they are often references I throw out.

It was pretty extraordinary for that to happen! Even Dante comments on it in The Divine Comedy, so it certainly made an impression on people.

Provence was in a good location, but what really made the daughters’ fortunes was the first marriage. When eldest daughter Marguerite (Margaret) married Louis IX, England took notice. Provence was close to Gascony/Aquitaine, so England was interested in preventing the region from becoming too tied to France. Consequently, Henry III married Eleanor, the second daughter. Richard of Cornwall married Sanchia as his second wife, and a younger brother of Louis married the youngest daughter, Beatrice.